Sampling trip to the North Kaibab RD

In my last post, I put up a time lapse video from the Centennial Forest here near Flagstaff where my crew was sampling ponderosa pine for biomass and volume as part of a larger, national FIA-funded project where NAU’s Wood Science and Forest Biometrics lab is working with Federal and State cooperators to collect tree information for national scale biomass and carbon stock estimators for forests of the United States.

Anyway, later that same week, Phil Radtke and a crew from Virginia Tech’s Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation arrived and after working a day here in town we all headed up to the North Kaibab to do some serious sampling. The crew visited Fire Point, had milkshkaes at Jacob Lake, and sampled 18 trees of various species. More information on this protect can be found here: http://www.legacytreedata.org

So here’s the time lapse of Phil and crew processing a couple trees…about five hours worth of work in just under two minutes!


Andrew Sánchez Meador on Vimeo.

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Congratulations Greg Black!

NCUR-logo-WebWe here at quantitativeecology.org are happy to announce that our own Greg Black will be presenting his work at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) at the University of Kentucky in April. Greg’s submission, titled “Stand structure and composition in treatment areas following the 2012 Grand Fire” was chosen from more than 4,000 submissions and we are proud of Greg’s work and contributions to his field of study. Our lab is sincerely pleased that Greg will have the opportunity to present his work to peers, faculty, and staff from around the world!

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More Fun with LiDAR

LiDARPlotView Just a little animated GIF showing LiDAR from the North Kaibab. Notice the penetration achieved and the resolution it provides for picking out large trees, small bushes, and topography.
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Prezi on overview of LEARN

Yesterday, I presented an invited talk to the Kaibab National Forest of an overview of the ERI’s LEARN (Long-term Ecological Assessment and Restoration Network). LEARN includes ten permanently marked, well-documented research sites where researchers have used standardized methods of data collection to facilitate long-term monitoring. The LEARN allows researchers and land managers to compare the effects of forest restoration treatments (and in one case, fuels reduction) on all aspects of ecosystem dynamics across a variety of forest types from pinyon-juniper to ponderosa pine to dry mixed conifer. Research on LEARN sites has been tremendously productive (over 120 peer-reviewed manuscripts), and has proven influential in informing larger, landscape-scale restoration treatments across the Southwest. Check it out…

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